Articles tagged with: Devizes

What's Inn a Name?

on Wednesday, 16 July 2014. Posted in Traditions and Folklore, Wiltshire Places

Some of the most popular talks I give are those dealing with the meaning of inn and pub names. Currently we don’t have a great variety of pub names in Wiltshire but we do still have some interesting ones. The Green Dragon at Alderbury was used by Charles Dickens in Martin Chuzzlewitt, as he was staying nearby while writing this novel. Dickens used many hostelries in his books and in this case he renamed it the Blue Dragon; perhaps the sign was somewhat faded to a pale blue and he misinterpreted it as it would have been unlikely that the name was on the building.

The green dragon came from the earls of Pembroke and many of the early names used the badges of great families. The red lion of John of Gaunt, the black bear of the earls of Warwick and the white hart of Richard II are still common today. From the 18th century the full coat of arms was often used so that in Fovant we have the Pembroke Arms. The association with the badge or coat of arms often indicated that the family owned the property or were the chief landowners in the area.

Wiltshire and Swindon's Historic Landscape

on Tuesday, 11 March 2014. Posted in Archaeology

In April 2012 the Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Landscape Characterisation (HLC) Project was launched. The intention of the project was to study the whole county and to identify the historic and archaeological processes which have influenced the modern landscape.

This work should help in understanding the evolution of the settlements and countryside and to identify what we can see that is typical and what is unusual.

 Now, two years into the project, real progress is being made in analysing the areas where we live, work and visit within Wiltshire. Currently, an area of c.194,000 ha (1940 km2) has been characterised. This includes many of the well-known urban and rural landscapes that we all know and enjoy – such as Salisbury Plain and Swindon. Data exists for many of the parishes, and the coverage is expanding all the time!

 

A trip to Stonehenge Visitor Centre

on Tuesday, 18 February 2014. Posted in Archaeology

The Conservation and Museums Advisory Service were lucky enough to be given a tour around the new Stonehenge Visitor Centre last week.

Newly opened by English Heritage at the end of last year the centre transforms the experience of visiting Stonehenge. The route to the stones is now a brisk walk or a rather warmer ride in the fleet of Land Rover trains. This keeps the car park away from the monument itself, restoring the stones more to their setting within the landscape.

Being newly opened the site is still developing – work had just started on the construction of replica Neolithic roundhouses on the day we visited.

For me one of the most exciting things about visiting and the biggest change from the previous experience is that for the first time you can see objects found at the site on display.

The vast majority of the finds that have been discovered in the Stonehenge landscape over the years are now held by the Salisbury and South Wiltshire Museum and the Wiltshire Museum in Devizes. Working in partnership, the two museums have loaned some of these artefacts to English Heritage for display, allowing the visitor centre to give a good feel for how people over the centuries made and used Stonehenge.

Some of the conservation work to get these objects ready for display was done by my conservator colleagues back in Chippenham, who were really pleased to be able to see their finished work on show.

If you are able, I would thoroughly recommend a trip to Stonehenge, Salisbury and Devizes. There is no better way to get up close to the artefacts of Neolithic and Bronze Age Wiltshire.

Tim Burge, Museums Officer

Prehistoric Wiltshire Galleries

on Friday, 29 November 2013. Posted in Museums

I was delighted to be amongst over 200 people in Devizes on Monday to celebrate the official opening of the new Prehistoric Wiltshire galleries at the Wiltshire Museum.

The culmination of years of planning, fundraising and hard graft by staff and volunteers has allowed the museum to put together a suite of galleries that any museum would be proud of.

So, just what Do our visitors come to see?

on Tuesday, 05 November 2013. Posted in History Centre

I thought it may be of interest to take a look on your behalf at the kinds of original documents visitors order out when they visit our search rooms, to give you an idea of the wide range of requests we receive for documents each day. I chose Tuesday 22nd October at random, and got peeking!

Tenancy agreement for the stalls

Many visitors pre-order material so that it is waiting for them when they arrive (a good idea if you have a lot to look through).

One such researcher was looking at some Great Western Railway plans for the stables next to Paddington Station.

They included a tenancy agreement for stalling dated 1905 (Ref: 2515/210 Box 128) and the elevation to London Street by the Engineers Works office in 1912 (2515/403/375).

 

 

Ordered out on the day was material from the Earl of Pembroke collection (Ref: 2057) including the account of H.M. Holdsworth with the Right Honorable George Robert Charles Earl of Pembroke for the estate of Wilts for one year as to rents to Michelmas 1880 (Ref: 2057/A1/99). Estate surveys (Ref: 2057/563) and a wages book (Ref: 2057/A5/32) were also of interest, and wages books may also give the name of an ancestor who worked on the estate.

Paper Conservation Volunteering at the History Centre

on Tuesday, 03 September 2013. Posted in Conservation

Saya Honda Miles has been volunteering with the Archives conservation team to help with large conservation projects. She has been working with Senior Conservation officers Paul Smith and Sarah Money conserve Inland Revenue maps from 1901, 19th Century tissue plans of Great Wishford Church and manuscripts for Sir Richard Colt-Hoare’s volumes: The Ancient History of Wiltshire and The History of Modern Wiltshire from the Wiltshire Museum.


Saya graduated with a First-class honours degree in Conservation from Camberwell College of Arts in 2008.  After graduation, she worked on a cellulose nitrate negative deep-freezing project at the Ashmolean Museum. She became an Icon Intern for the Conservation of Photographic Materials; hosted by English Heritage and National Trust in 2009. After the internship, Saya started her private business; SMILES Conservation and she became a member of the ICON Photographic Materials Group Committee in 2010.


In March 2013, she completed the Red Box Project; a digitisation and conservation project of 600,000 open-access architectural photographs as a project conservator at the English Heritage Archives. After completing the project, she started volunteering at the Wiltshire and Swindon History Centre in May 2013 to refresh her paper conservation skills. She has recently been appointed at the English Heritage Archives as the Maternity Cover Assistant Archive Conservator.

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