Articles tagged with: Bishop of Salisbury

Celebrating the 8OOth anniversary of the Magna Carta

on Monday, 16 March 2015. Posted in Conservation

The Wiltshire and Swindon History Centre have been preparing an up-coming display to mark the 800th anniversary of the Magna Carta, which is to be held at Lacock Abbey.

The display will feature three original documents: a facsimile of the 1225 Magna Carta presented to Lacock abbey after the original charter was presented to the nation; and two enrolled copies of a 1300 confirmation of the charter in the archives of the marquis of Ailesbury of Savernake and Marlborough borough which are held at the Wiltshire and Swindon History Centre.

These documents will be supported by a display illustrating life in Wiltshire in the 13th century and the impact of Magna Carta. Copies of documents will include images from the pageant in 1932 to celebrate the 800th anniversary of the founding of Lacock abbey.

The exhibition will be at Lacock Abbey in June and July and then at the Wiltshire and Swindon History Centre. The screens will then be available for display around the county.

A project to conserve and display 13th Century documents for the Salisbury Cathedral Magna Carta exhibition.

The Archive conservation team have recently been working on a project to conserve and display four 13th Century parchment documents for the 800th Anniversary of the Magna Carta exhibition at Salisbury Cathedral.

The documents are: a charter, an indulgence, a declaration of canonical obedience and an agreement of tithes.

Tropenell and Chalfield and Naughty Lady Constance

on Saturday, 02 March 2013. Posted in Architecture

Last week I visited an enthusiastic meeting of the Atworth W.I. and talked about the meanings of pub names. At the end of the meeting I suggested that I might run a History Centre day course about the history and development of the village later in the year; this met with approval and I will be organising it for June 2013. At the moment we’ll selling surplus copies of older and better quality (although not always better physical quality) Wiltshire books; this week a gentleman came in and bought the two volumes of the limited edition Tropenell Cartulary as he is writing a new guide to Great Chalfield Manor (in the civil parish of Atworth). This reminded me that I once had a friend with the surname Trapnell, descended from that medieval family. All these coincidences gave me a subject for this blog!

Thomas Tropenell was born around 1405 and married twice, both times to widows, but it was only from his second marriage, when he was over 50, that there were any children. He seems to have been a man of the law and claimed the manor of Great Chalfield as he was a descendent by marriage of the Percy family, who had held it from 1201 until a time of dispute by various branches of the family in the early 15th century.


An interesting sidelight on this family is provided by the antics of Sir Henry de Percy’s second wife Constance, described as “bedfellow and cosyn to Maister Robert Wayville, bisshoppe of Salisbury, born to no land, neither to none arms”. Possibly because of “the naughty lyf the said Constance his second wyf lyed in with the bisshoppe Wayvile and with others” Sir Henry went on a pilgrimage to Jerusalem in 1354. Unfortunately he never reached the city, dying at Cologne. Constance managed to survive a further three husbands, including John de Percy, no relation to her first husband, of Little Chalfield.

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