Military

Wiltshire Commemorating WWI

on Tuesday, 19 August 2014. Posted in Military, Museums

In common with other parts of the country museums and heritage organisations across Wiltshire are busy commemorating and exploring the legacy of the First World War.
I thought I would use this post to update you on some of what is currently going on at museums.

Young Gallery, Salisbury - Cicatrix
http://www.younggallerysalisbury.co.uk/event/cicatrix/

A visual arts project of three parts: installation, drawing and film. The audience is presented with another perspective of the WWI Legacy with Salisbury Plain providing the cornerstone for the collaboration exploring the notion that memory provides the fourth dimension to any landscape, Cicatrix offers a challenging alternative viewpoint to mark the centenary of The Great War.

Bradford on Avon Museum
http://www.bradfordonavonmuseum.co.uk/archives/8671

Exhibition focused on the themes The Eve of War, The Front, The Home Front, and Twin Towns.

Calne Heritage Centre 1914-18 Memorial Project http://www.calneheritage.co.uk/exhibitions.php?extype=Current

A five year long project dedicated to the lives of the ancestors of Calne residents, past and present, who lived through WWI. People are being asked to produce posters that detail how their ancestors were affected by the war, which will be displayed and then become part of the Heritage Centre archive.

Wiltshire at War: Community Stories
http://wiltshireatwar.org.uk/

As mentioned previously (http://www.wshc.eu/blog/item/wiltshire-at-war-community-stories.html?category_id=19) this county wide project is now picking up pace. Emma our Project Officer is busy working with groups across the county to gather up stories of the home front in Wiltshire, Please visit http://wiltshireatwar.org.uk/ for more information or if you have a story to share. For those of you with links to Market Lavington please come along to Market Lavington Museum on Weds 3rd September from 2.30-4.30 when there will be an opportunity to share and record your family stories of the war.

The Rifles Museum, Salisbury - A View of The Great War
http://www.thewardrobe.org.uk/museum/news-and-events/article/opening-of-the-exhibition-a-view-of-the-great-war

Artwork created by children from two local schools, Avon Valley College, Durrington and Bishop Wordsworth’s School in Salisbury, as part of ‘National Memory, Local Stories’, working with the National Portrait Gallery.

Salisbury Museum - Fighting on the Home Front (Oct 4 2014-Jan 17 2015)

http://www.salisburymuseum.org.uk/whats-on/exhibitions/salisbury-great-war-fighting-home-front

Salisbury Plain was at the heart of preparing British and Empire troops for war with its many camps, training trenches and airfields and has a unique place in this country’s military history. Using letters, photographs, medals and other personal mementos loaned by the public, as well as loans from Wiltshire & Swindon History Centre and objects from the Museum’s own collections, the exhibition will tell the story of Wiltshire’s war through Wiltshire people’s experiences.

Warminster Museum
http://www.warminstermuseum.org.uk/whats%20on.html

Sep 8th 2014, 7pm
The tank in World War I – illustrated talk by Alwyn Hardy, son of a tank commander


To stay up to date with a whole range of First World War activity across Wiltshire please follow the Heritage in Wiltshire blog at http://heritageinwiltshire.wordpress.com/

Tim Burge, Museums Officer, August 2013

Wiltshire Women of WWI: The Heroine Project Presents DOROTHY LAWRENCE

on Friday, 25 July 2014. Posted in Events, Military

In June 1915, armed only with a bicycle, her wits and a burning journalistic ambition, a young woman named Dorothy Lawrence set out from England determined to reach the frontline of fighting in northern France.

“I’ll see what an ordinary English girl, without credentials or money can accomplish. I’ll see what I can manage as a war correspondent!”

Sleeping in ditches, haystacks and flea-bitten dugouts, Dorothy wheedled, charmed and hoodwinked her way past suspicious gendarmes and the unwanted attentions of frustrated soldiers, to spend ten days under heavy shelling in the French town of Albert shortly before the Battle of Loos.

Revisiting WWII at Longhedge

on Friday, 04 July 2014. Posted in Archaeology, Military

Archaeologists are often thought only to be interested in very old remains – and those are very important to us – but we are also interested in more modern finds and features too. Too often we think we already know everything about events that have happened within living memory, but it’s surprising how often things turn up that have been forgotten, at least within the public record.


Longehedge is an area of land to the north of the Old Sarum Airfield. Old Sarum airfield has a long and illustrious military history. Our original interest in Longhedge was sparked by an Iron Age settlement that appears on aerial photographs. Initial geophysical survey showed the enclosed Iron Age settlement, but also lots of other interesting and unusual features that appeared to be military in origin.


So, in order to get some more information about all of these interesting features, a trenched evaluation was undertaken. The results from the geophysical surveys and trial trenches were mapped (below) and show the iron age and modern features.

Wiltshire at War: Community Stories

on Friday, 20 June 2014. Posted in Military, Museums

As part of activity taking place across Wiltshire commemorating 100 years since the First World War, museums in the county have been successful in getting Heritage Lottery funding to deliver an exciting project.

Wiltshire at War: Community Stories will invite communities from across Wiltshire to share their stories, memories and artefacts of the impact the First World War had on the county. Working with local museums and heritage centres these will be recorded, stored and shared to create a picture of how Wiltshire life was affected by the conflict.

 

Stories will be presented through a series of travelling exhibitions and also a website.

Alongside this schools and libraries will be hosting activities, talks and events, inspired by the stories from the exhibitions.

DAPper formation for supplying food to the troops in WWI…

on Friday, 06 June 2014. Posted in Archives, Military

While continuing my work of listing the papers of the Earls of Radnor, I came across a file entitled ‘The Directorate of Agricultural Production’ and dated 1917-1919. Not the most enthralling subject at first glance, but as I read through the papers I discovered that they dealt with an almost completely neglected aspect of war on the Western Front.


Amidst the horror and carnage of trench warfare, it is easy to forget that it was an enormous task to keep the troops supplied with food, drink, clothing and ammunition. This demanded a herculean effort by the Army Service Corps to source and transport supplies over the Channel, and by the autumn of 1917 there were almost 2 million men of the British and Empire armies serving in France and Flanders needing to be fed. In addition, unrestricted submarine warfare by the Germans meant that not only were food supplies running low at home, but also shipping losses resulted in fewer ships being available to carry food to France. The answer was for the British Army to grow some of its own food, thus solving both these problems at once.

Life in the Navy

on Tuesday, 03 June 2014. Posted in Military

Among the papers of the Jeffrey family deposited in the Wiltshire & Swindon Archives, (Ref:1369/16) are a remarkable collection of letters to and from John Russell, a man probably best described as an 18th century equivalent to Samuel Pepys.

Working in the first half of that century, Russell became Clerk to the Navy at Deptford from 1730, having already spent much time at sea and went on to become Consul General in Lisbon in 1749.


The letters offer a wonderful insight into naval life during this period and often refer to ‘celebrities’ of the time. Beau Brummel, for instance, gets a mention in one letter. Archivists at the History Centre believe this collection has a national importance.


Unfortunately, the ravages of time, mould and mice have taken their toll leaving the letters extremely weak and fragile and requiring conservation.

The Archive Conservation staff have an on-going programme of repair and another folder of 50 letters (they number hundreds in total), is nearing completion. Because of their precarious condition full, traditional repair has been carried out involving backing, endorsements and infilling. This will prevent further damage and at last make them accessible to researchers.

Mervyn Grist
Conservator

<<  1 2 3 [45 6  >>  

logos1

Accredited Archive Service